Thing-a-Week #44

Last month there was a discussion thread on Ravelry about a $300 hooded scarf from Spratters & Jayne. The basic tenor of the thread was that people couldn’t believe someone was charging $300 for a chunky scarf. I was intrigued, and decided to see if I could make one too. This is the result.

Thing a Week #44: Hooded Scarf

I reverse engineered the scarf based only on pictures on the web. I also chose a yarn–Cascade Magnum–that appeared to be very similar to what they used. It’s a very thick single, made from Peruvian Highland Wool. It’s so similar (even down to color selection!) that I have a feeling it’s from the same mill. It’s crochet, using a Q hook (which is very large… 15mm). Minus any small differences in stitch count, gauge, or construction, I think my scarf came very close to the original (found here).

Thing a Week #44: Hooded Scarf

(This picture is my own; I arranged the scarf so that it appears similar to the manufacturer’s pictures for comparison.)

What I learned during this exercise was that $300 is not really that far off. The yarn cost me nearly $80 alone. It only took a few hours to make, but once you factor in that, shipping, and distribution, it’s not that much of a stretch, even with reduced material and labor costs for the manufacturer.

I think people are incredulous at high prices because they think that hand-knit and -crochet items are inherently cheap, something you do because you can’t afford to buy the “real” thing at the store. So not true. Handcrafted items can take many (many, many!) hours to make, but they’re often sold for only a little over the cost of materials. Knitters and crocheters undervalue their time, and buyers don’t want to pay what the item is really worth. It’s why I never even think about selling what I make; it’s only for the pleasure of making it. Still, it’s nice to see a business model that works.

Hooded Scarf

I do love this scarf. The yarn is great, and the scarf so very warm and soft. I can see why people would shell out $300 for it, though I’m glad I can just make it myself.

Hooded Scarf

Thanks to my husband Bryan for the photos. I keep saying how handy he is!

(Note: I am not making the pattern available for this scarf. This was solely for the challenge; I have no interest in encroaching on Spratters & Jayne’s turf, either by distrbuting the pattern or by selling the completed scarf. However, it’s really not that hard to figure out if you really want to make one for yourself!)

Hooded Scarf

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About Elle
May I mambo dogface to the banana patch?

6 Responses to Thing-a-Week #44

  1. Tracy says:

    I like your style!

  2. Joi says:

    Elle, Thank you so much for illustrating why most of us do not sell our work. I’m going to share this post with a few friends and relatives.

  3. Hi Elle,

    You did a great job, and it looks great on you! I saw it on Ravelry and actually liked it. I’ve put it on my ‘to do’ list. I started crocheting a few months ago, but looking at the stitches I’m sure I can manage this.

    Handcrafted items can take many (many, many!) hours to make, but they’re often sold for only a little over the cost of goods. Knitters and crocheters undervalue their time, and buyers don’t want to pay what the item is really worth…

    I couldn’t agree more! I’ve seen this a lot with technical writing. I also make beaded jewelry, soaps, etc., Harlan Ellison rants about this (from a writing perspective — but it can apply to so many other areas too) in a piece called Pay the Writer. If you search on YouTube, you’ll find it.

  4. twinkletoes2day says:

    Wow! What a great job you have done. So talented to have done that. I look forward to using your pattern and I will link back to you from my Flickr pics :D

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